ATLANTA, Ga. (CW69 News at 10) — The family of a man who died after being tased by Washington County deputies spoke on a major ruling by Georgia’s Supreme Court. Three years after Eurie Martin’s death, the three former deputies involved could now face a trial.

In early November, the Supreme Court overturned a trial court’s decision, ruling the lower court should not have granted immunity to sheriff’s deputies Rhett Scott, Henry Lee Copeland and Michael Howell.

Attorneys for Martin’s estate announced at a Monday morning press conference the case will likely go to trial.

“This is about the humanity of a man who deserved to live,” said Mawuli Davis, an attorney representing Martin’s estate. “This is the first ruling of its kind in Georgia, and really the first ruling where qualified immunity is applied in this nation,” said Francys Johnson, the co-attorney for the estate.

They say the deputies tased Martin more than 15 times on July 7, 2017, before he suffocated and died. Family members spoke publicly for the first time. “My brother did not deserve to die the way that he died,” said Helen Gilbert, Martin’s sister. “I miss his soft speaking voice, his smile, and he was a very talented person,” said Barbara Evans, another sister.

Court records indicate the incident happened when Martin asked a homeowner for water while taking a long walk. He kept walking when the homeowner declined, but that person called 911 to report a suspicious person. Dash cam video shows some never-before seen angles of deputies tasing Martin, who allegedly suffered from mental illness. Attorneys compared the incident to the George Floyd case.

“We believe that the review of these videos by the Supreme Court, which they were allowed to do, clearly played a part in the decision to reverse the lower court,” said Davis. He said the trial could start in the spring. “It should be in our favor to get justice for what has been done to this family,” said Bertha Darden, another family member.

CW69 reached out to the deputies’ attorneys, and there was no immediate response.