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Florida Doctor Faces 200 Counts Of Health Care Fraud 

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Federal prosecutors say Ona Colasante billed Medicare, Medicaid and Blue Cross Blue Shield of Florida for medical tests that patients didn't need. (KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)

Federal prosecutors say Ona Colasante billed Medicare, Medicaid and Blue Cross Blue Shield of Florida for medical tests that patients didn’t need. (KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)

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GAINESVILLE, Fla. (AP) — A Gainesville doctor surrendered this week after she was charged with more than 200 counts of health care fraud for allegedly charging the government full price for prescription drugs, even though she was giving patients cheaper drugs not approved by the Food and Drug Administration.

U.S. attorney’s officials said Ona Colasante, 57, turned herself in Tuesday after being indicted by a grand jury.

Colasante “misleadingly” billed Medicare, Medicaid and Blue Cross Blue Shield of Florida for medical tests, including colonoscopies, X-rays, and hearing tests that patients didn’t need. She also billed for substance abuse counseling, smoking cessation and other treatments that patients never received, authorities said.

She used that money to buy less expensive non-FDA-approved drugs and devices online from Canada and other countries, including mislabeled birth control devices and osteoporosis drugs, according to the indictment.

The doctor then charged the government for administering those drugs, according to the indictment. Officials said Colasante gave the drugs to patients without their knowledge or consent.

“She is going to defend each and every allegation in an attempt to clear her name,” her attorney Gilbert Schaffnit said.

Colasante’s case is unusual in that authorities usually target high dollar scams. The indictment did not include how much the doctor allegedly billed the government programs for. But her practice billed Medicare for a relatively low dollar amount in 2012, according to federal health officials. She billed just over $55,000 compared to the state’s top two billers, a West Palm Beach ophthalmologist who billed nearly $21 million and an Ocala cardiologist who billed $18 million.

In a January blog post, Colasante detailed how she was forced to close her practice after the FBI raided her office in 2011 and that her bank account had been frozen.

A trial is set for June. If convicted, she faces 10 years in prison for each of the health care fraud counts.

(TM and © Copyright 2014 CBS Radio Inc. and its relevant subsidiaries. CBS RADIO and EYE Logo TM and Copyright 2014 CBS Broadcasting Inc. Used under license. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.)

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